Brain Injury Awareness Week: Survivors are already aware of difference, it’s time for everyone else to catch up

This week marks Brain Injury Awareness Week in the UK. In the neurorehabilitation service I work in we’ll be celebrating with a range of brain-related activities. We’ll be watching injury related films such as The Crash Reel, having a quiz and getting crafty with brain-themed cake decoration. We’ll be promoting the importance of looking after your brain – wearing a helmet, eating well and taking time to relax. Whilst it’s appropriate for us to throw these events, I can’t help but feel that are energy can be somewhat misplaced. Brain Injury Survivors aren’t the one’s who need their awareness raised. They live with disability and difference every day. Though some have difficulty fully understanding their injuries, they are experts in their own experience. The problem relates more to everyone else, the vast swathes of the population who have little understanding of brain injury and limit the social inclusion of survivors in their ignorance.

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Brain cake – delicious but perhaps not really raising awareness about the experience of brain injury

On the whole general knowledge about the brain isn’t high. It is after all, a highly complex organ that even expert neuroscientists don’t fully understand. Myths about the brain abound, ideas about “left and right brain thinkers” and the percentage of our brain we use haven’t been especially helpful. Understanding the brain requires looking at who we are as people, what makes us human, when makes up our identity, and how much control we truly have over our behaviour. This is what makes the brain fascinating, but it’s a difficult topic to confront. And then extrapolating from the delicate, blancmange like organ to understanding why it is that a survivor might suddenly get angry for no obviously observable reason, struggle to manage bills, become exhausted and overwhelmed, or any one of the many common consequences of brain injury.

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