Halloween Costume Inspiration: Robotica

So, what did everyone dress up as for Halloween? I’m actually celebrating it next weekend, so I think I still have a bit of mileage for thinking about costume ideas (and buying all the spooky tat I can get my hands on).

I’ve dressed up as a robot before. It mostly involved cardboard and a lot of tin-foil. However the look can be done much better, going for more of a bionic look, half-human half-robot, or something of a futuristic cyborg. Or saving that, just taking a bit of inspiration from Barbarella to create a shiny silver space-age outfit. Here are a few of my picks for tough and shiny things.

The 54th Annual GRAMMY Awards - Red Carpet

I had no idea who this woman was (apparently she is a Russian singer), but this terminator-style arm piece kicks so much ass. Designed by Leonid Gurevich and created by avant garde jewellers Gilding Primal Instinct, it’s made out of replica guns.

Girl Armour specialise in these one-off, amazing breastplate outfits. I’ve never seen anything quite like them, they’re crafted to such fine detail. They look pretty sturdy too, don’t imagine they’re all that comfortable to wear.

lascivious-tamzin-lillywhite-01

The Lascivious SS13 collection features this great metallic two-piece that seems a bit too special to hide under clothing.

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Nange Magro’s EEG-activated dress

Inspired by modern technology and Sci-Fi and driven by a ‘passion for surrealism and obscure, alternative worlds’ , London-based designer Nange Magro created the ‘Mechapolypse‘. The futuristic ‘electronic couture creation includes a cap with an EEG chip, detecting the electrical activity of the wearer’s brain. The designer states that when the outfit changes depending on the level of concentration, which I presume means that levels of alpha waves (associated with relaxation) are being measured. Changes in activation lead to the dress’s spine lighting up and the skirt opening up, rather like an insect’s wings, to reveal a transparent latex skirt. With a bit of practice, the wearer should be able to control the dress (and perhaps avoiding revealing themselves at the wrong time!).

On her website Nange describes her fascination with the concept of garments that are ‘technological sculptures’, “Which move and are in synthesis with the person who is wearing them represents both her ideal future and passion. A garment should represent an extension of the body and brain, and not merely be a mask that aims to divide or mediate the connection between a person and the surrounding world. Clothing should be something more than skin. It should be something that we can choose to describe ourselves in our own personal way; controlling it, means a lot more than we usually think. Being conscious of our body and its surrounding environment is one of the most important issues today.”

So what’s next, underwear that disintegrates with high levels of arousal? A shirt that shocks you if you start nodding off at work? I love the Giger-esque spiked helmet and spine but I’m not sure how I feel about my dress opening and closing according to my brain-waves. I applaud the unusual hybrid of science and fashion but I think this style may just not be practical for everyday wear (and also rather open to abuse!).